Category Archives: Season 1

Intermediate Season 1, Lesson 13: The Future Simple and the Future Perfect

learn English online free future tense future simple and future perfect intermediate English lesson

Hey everyone!

In today’s intermediate lesson, we are going to look two different ways of using the future tense.

We will learn:

1. The Future Simple
2. The Future Perfect

Let’s start.

1. The Future Simple

This describes:
- Something the speaker thinks/knows will happen
“It will rain later.”
“He’ll be here at 6 o’clock.” 
“We won’t need any money today.” 
“Sunset will be at 6:55pm.” 

"It will be a beautiful day today."

- A sudden decision
“I’ll call the police!”
“I’ll go and get Dad.” 

To make the future simple:
Subject + will(shall) + verb infinitive
I/You/He/She/It/We/You/They + will(shall) + watch/eat/go/play/etc.
“You will need an umbrella today.”
Shall is more formal.
“I shall describe it to you.” 

To make the negative future simple, use “will not” or “won’t“. 
“She will not tell me why she’s sad.”
“We won’t need a car in London.”
To be more formal, use “shall not” or “shan’t“.
“I shall be requiring your help later.”
“We shan’t be returning to this restaurant!” 

2. The Future Perfect

This describes:
- Something that will have finished by a certain time in the future.
“I will have found out my exam result by tomorrow.”
“We’ll have arrived in Australia by Thursday.”
“She’ll have finished school in a week.”

- Speculation about something the speaker thinks has probably happened.
“You can’t find your book? You will have left it at school.”(You have probably left your book at school)
“He will have eaten that steak.”(He probably ate that steak

"She will have had a baby in a month."

To make the future perfect:
Subject + will(shall) + have + verb past participle
I/You/He/She/It/We/You/They + will(shall) + have + eaten/gone/studied/thrown/etc.
“They will have finished their meal.”
“We’ll have run out of money by Wednesday.”
To be more formal, use “shall have“.
“I shall have paid you in a week.”

To make the negative future perfect, use “will not have” or “won’t have“.
“They will not have eaten all the bread by tomorrow.”
“He won’t have finished reading that book in a month!”
To be more formal, use “shall not have” or “shan’t have“. 
“You shall not have finished.”
“We shan’t have sold all of the flowers.” 

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Intermediate Season 1, Lesson 12: The Simple Past and the Past Progressive

learn English online free intermediate English past simple and past progressive

Hey guys!

Today we will look at some ways of using the past tense in English.

There are many ways to talk about the past in English. It can be confusing for English learners to know which form of the past tense to use.

Today we will explore two different forms of the past tense:
- the simple past
- the past progressive

Let’s begin!

1. The Simple Past

We use this to describe:
- An action or actions in the past
“I had an orange for breakfast.”
“I saw my brother at the supermarket.”
“They cleaned the cars.”

The woman smiled.

- Actions that happened in a sequence
“I watched the movie and then walked home.”
“She bought the groceries and carried them to her car.”
“You gave him the letter and then left?”

- Actions that happened in the middle of other actions 
“I was relaxing on the sofa when she came home.”
“The kids were playing tennis when the rain started.”
“The burglar stole their TV while they were sleeping.”

To make the simple past, use the past tense (e.g. spoke, ate) and not the past participle (e.g. spoken, eaten). 
“I watched him walk away.”
To make the negative simple past, use did not + infinitive.
“He did not study for the exam.”
“I did not know the news.”
To make the negative simple past in spoken English, you should use “didn’t”.
“We didn’t have time to visit you.”

The man was walking along when his phone rang.

2. The Past Progressive

Use this to describe:

- An action that was happening in the past
“I was listening to the radio.”
“She was describing her holiday.”
“We were waiting for two hours.”

-  Two or more actions that were happening at the same time
“He was watching TV while she was washing the dishes.”
“The boys were waiting at the beach but the girls were waiting at the mall.”
“The students were studying but the teachers were drinking coffee and talking.”

- A past action that gets interrupted by a different action or event
“I was sleeping until the phone rang.”
“He was driving home when the car skidded.”
“She was sitting quietly when the man entered the room.”

To make the past progressive, use the past tense of “to be” and the continuous form of a verb.
Subject (I/You/He/She/It/We/You/They) + to be past form (was/were) + continuous form of verb (verb-ing)
“He was eating sushi.”
“We were playing golf.”
“I was expecting a phone call.”

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Intermediate Season 1, Lesson 11: Shut the Door!

learn English online free intermediate lesson imperative and articles

Hello English learners!

In today’s intermediate lesson, we will practice using “a/an” and “the”. We will also use the imperative of a verb.

Articles A/An and The

A/An: For unspecified things. (We don’t know which one). Use “An” for words beginning with vowel sounds (a, e, i, o, u sounds). Use “A” for words beginning with other sounds.
For example:
1. Can I have a sandwich please?

 

 

 

 

2. I saw an ostrich.

 

 

 

 

3. There’s a TV show about Africa.

 

 

 

 

The: For specified things. (We know which one). Or there is only one of something.
For example:
1. Isn’t the moon beautiful tonight?

 

 

 

 

2. The dog is on the sofa.

 

 

 

 

3. Prince William’s grandmother is the Queen.

 

 

 

 

Imperative Verbs

Imperative verbs are used to tell someone to do something.
The imperative form is the same as the infinitive, without “to“.
For example:
infinitive: to eat; imperative: eat
infinitive: to watch; imperative: watch
infinitive: to study; imperative: study

Example sentences:
1. Give me that book please.

 

 

 

 

2. Put the groceries away!

 

 

 

 

3. Paint the fence tomorrow.

 

 

 

 

4. Tell me your name.

 

 

 

 

5. Be quiet!

 

 

 

 

6. Stop shouting!

 

 

 

 

Now let’s practise.

Please click “Start”.

"Shut the Door!" Quiz

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What was your score? I hope this lesson was useful.

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Intermediate Season 1, Lesson 10: The Day of Seven Billion!

learn English online free the day of seven billion

Hey everyone!

Welcome to today’s intermediate lesson! This is a reading lesson. Please read the text. At the end of the lesson there is a quiz, so you can check your understanding. Enjoy!

Here is the text:

The Day of Seven Billion

Have you heard of “The Day of Seven Billion”? This was the day that the world’s population reached seven billion. Seven billion people! That’s incredible. Seven billion is seven thousand million. Or 7,000,000,000. What an incredible number of humans.

The Day of Seven Billion was October 31st, 2011. Of course, it’s impossible to count every human in the world. But that was the symbolic day that was chosen by the United Nations.

Where do all the people live?

Here are the population totals of each continent:
Africa: 1,020,000,000 (one billion, twenty million)
Asia: 3,880,000,000 (three billion, eight hundred and eighty million)
Australasia: 33,000,000 (thirty-three million)
Europe: 731,000,000 (seven hundred and thirty-one million)
North America: 535,000,000 (five hundred and thirty-five million)
South America: 386,000,000 (three hundred and eighty-six million)

The population of the world is growing quickly. It reached six billion in 1999, and is expected to reach eight billion in 2027. Why is it going up so quickly? Some of the reasons include better healthcare and nutrition. People have better medicine and food, so they can live much longer.

Having so many people is a big challenge. Many problems like pollution, overcrowding, food shortages and deforestation are caused by a growing population. We will have to work hard to avoid these problems.

On the other hand, a huge population of people can have benefits. Since there are so many humans, we are able to invent new technology and develop our culture very quickly. Also, there is so much diversity in the world, like different races of people and different languages.

Now try the quiz. Please click “Start”!

"The Day of Seven Billion" Quiz

Start Congratulations - you have completed "The Day of Seven Billion" Quiz. You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%%
Your answers are highlighted below.

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Intermediate Season 1, Lesson 9: The Secret Ingredient of Coca-Cola

what is the secret ingredient of coca cola learn English online free

Do you like Coca-Cola?

How often do you drink Coke?

Coca-Cola was first made by John Pemberton in 1886. At the time it was sold as a type of medicine. Since that time, Coke has been the most famous soft drink in the world. For over a hundred years, billions of people have enjoyed the taste.

Why is Coca-Cola So Delicious?

What makes Coca-Cola so delicious? Why do people like it so much? What is the secret ingredient of Coke?

The answer is something called Merchandise 7X. This secret ingredient gives Coke its amazing, unique flavour. Until recently, only a few people in the world knew the recipe for Merchandise 7X.

(Secret ingredient: Something in food or drink which makes you want more.)

Surprising Discovery

A photo from a 1979 newspaper shows a person holding a book. In the book you can see the recipe for Merchandise 7X.

What is the Recipe for Coca-Cola?

(Recipe: A list of ingredients in a food or drink. Also, the method for making it.)

- Fluid of coca
- Citric acid (3 ounces)
- Caffeine (10 ounces)
- Sugar 
- Water (2.5 gallons)
- Lime juice (2 pints)
- Vanilla (1 ounce)
- Caramel (1.5 ounces)
- Alcohol (8 ounces)
- Orange oil (20 drops)
- Lemon oil (30 drops)
- Nutmeg oil (10 drops)
- Coriander (5 drops)
- Neroli (10 drops)
- Cinnamon (10 drops)

So Can You Make Your Own Coca-Cola?

Of course, it would be almost impossible to make Coke yourself. To get the quantities right would be very hard, and how would you know the method for making the drink?

(Quantities: How much of each ingredient in a recipe.)

Alcohol in Coke

So, it seems that there is alcohol in Coca-Cola! It is only a tiny amount. And maybe the recipe has changed. Maybe there isn’t any alcohol in it these days. What do you think? How does it make you feel?

Intermediate Season 1, Lesson 8: One House, Two Houses; One Mouse, Two Mice?!

learn English online plural nouns

Hello intermediate level English learners! We have a very useful lesson for you today. We will be learning English noun plurals. Noun plurals in English can be a little difficult as there are many irregular forms. But don’t worry! In this lesson you will learn the rules for plurals, and the most common exceptions. Enjoy the lesson!

What Are Plurals?

Plurals are used to describe more than one of a noun.
For example:
- one cat
- three cats

 

 

 

 

- one woman
- five women

 

 

 

 

- a person
- some people

 

 

 

 

Regular Plural Nouns

1. Most plurals in English are easy. We just add -s to the end of a noun.
For example:
- one car
- four cars

 

 

 

 

- a table
- some tables

 

 

 

 

2. But nouns ending in the following sounds need -es:
ch, s, sh, x.
For example:
- a beach
- some beaches

 

 

 

 

- one bus
- two buses

 

 

 

 

- one flash
- six flashes

 

 

 

 

- a fax
- some faxes

 

 

 

 

3. For nouns ending in z, add -zes.
For example:
- one quiz
- eight quizzes

 

 

 

 

- a fez
- some fezzes

 

 

 

 

4. Most nouns with a consonant+o ending have -es at the end.
For example:
- this volcano
- these volcanoes

 

 

 

 

- a tomato
- some tomatoes

 

 

 

 

5. But, some loan words from Spanish and Italian only require an -s.
For example:
- one photo
- ten photos

 

 

 

 

- the piano
- the pianos

 

 

 

 

6. For nouns ending in f, change the f to -ves.
For example:
- one calf
- three calves

 

 

 

 

- a dwarf
- some dwarves

 

 

 

 

7. For nouns ending in consonant+y, change the y into -ies.
For example:
- a study
- some studies

 

 

 

 

- that party
- those parties

 

 

 

 

Irregular Plural Nouns

There are many irregular plural nouns in English. Here are some of the more common ones:

Singular / Plural
mouse / mice
tooth / teeth
man / men
woman / women
child / children
goose / geese
octopus / octopi

Nouns with Identical Singular and Plural Forms

Some words in English are the same in both singular and plural forms.

For example:
- a sheep
- some sheep

 

 

 

 

- one aircraft
- three aircraft

 

 

 

 

- one species
- five species

Words with Only Plural Forms

Some English words only have a plural form.

For example:
- trousers (“a pair of trousers” or “some trousers”, not “a trousers”)
- pants (“a pair of pants” or “some pants”, not “a pants”)

 

 

 

 

Compound Noun Plurals

For compound noun plurals, we add -s to the first noun.

For example:
- a father-in-law
- some fathers-in-law

- one runner-up
- four runners-up

Now let’s practice. Click Start!

English Plurals Quiz

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Intermediate Season 1, Lesson 7: How to Write in Cursive (Handwriting) Practice

how to write in cursive

Hey guys!

Today we will practise writing in cursive handwriting. If you are learning English then it is really helpful to be able to write in cursive. But cursive handwriting takes practice.

So below you will find some free printable cursive handwriting practise worksheets.

You can print the PDF below and then practice writing the seven different sentences.

Please click here for the free printable cursive handwriting practice worksheets (PDF).

If you missed the lessons where we learnt how to write in cursive writing, you can find them here:

Lesson 1
Lesson 2
Lesson 3

If this lesson is helpful, please tell me, and I will prepare more free printable cursive handwriting practice worksheets like this one.

Also, please try to share it on Facebook and Twitter.

Bye for now,

Jon

Intermediate Season 1, Lesson 6: How to Write in Cursive (Handwriting) Part 3

how to write in cursive handwriting

Hey everyone!

In the last two lessons, we have been learning how to write in cursive handwriting. Cursive handwriting is a difficult skill for English learners, but it can make your writing look so much more natural and also save you a lot of time.

If you missed the last two lessons, you can find the links here:

Part 1
Part 2

In this lesson, we will learn:
- Cursive capital “R”
- Cursive “R”
- Cursive capital “S”
- Cursive “S”
- Cursive capital “T”
- Cursive “T”
- Cursive capital “U”
- Cursive “U”
- Cursive capital “V”
- Cursive “V”
- Cursive capital “W”
- Cursive “W”
- Cursive capital “X”
- Cursive “X”
- Cursive capital “Y”
- Cursive “Y”
- Cursive capital “Z”
- Cursive “Z”
 

Here is the PDF: How to Write in Cursive, Lesson 3

If you like this lesson, please leave a comment below. And if this lesson was useful, please share it on Facebook or Twitter!

If you have finished this lesson, please click here for the next lesson, which has free printable cursive handwriting practice worksheets.

See you soon!

Jon

Intermediate Season 1, Lesson 5: How to Write in Cursive (Handwriting) Part 2

how to write in cursive hndwriting 2

Hey everyone!

Welcome to Jon’s English Classroom! In today’s lesson we will continue learning how to write in cursive handwriting.

 

 

We will learn the following:
- Cursive capital “G”
- Cursive “G”
- Cursive capital “H”
- Cursive “H”
- Cursive capital “I”
- Cursive “I”
- Cursive capital “J”
- Cursive “J”
- Cursive capital “K”
- Cursive “K”
- Cursive capital “L”
- Cursive “L”
- Cursive capital “M”
- Cursive “M”
- Cursive capital “N”
- Cursive “N”
- Cursive capital “O”
- Cursive “O”
- Cursive capital “P”
- Cursive “P”

- Cursive capital “Q”
- Cursive “Q”

You can find the PDF here: How to write in cursive, lesson 2

If you missed the last lesson, you can find it here.

If you are ready for the next lesson, you can find it here: How to Write in Cursive (Handwriting) Part 3.

And if you would like to practice, go here for free printable cursive handwriting practice worksheets.

Enjoy the lesson, and remember to share it on Facebook or Twitter! And remember to leave a comment!

Bye for now!

Jon

Intermediate Season 1, Lesson 4: How to Write in Cursive (Handwriting) Part 1

How to write cursive writing


Hey guys!

 

Welcome to the lesson!

When you write in English, you can save a lot of time by joining up your writing. This is called cursive writing, joined-up writing or just handwriting. Writing cursive English is a great way to look like a pro!

In today’s lesson we are going to look at how to write cursive handwriting. We will look at:
- Cursive handwriting rules
- Cursive capital “A”
- Cursive “A”
- Cursive capital “B”
- Cursive “B”
- Cursive capital “C”
- Cursive “C”
- Cursive capital “D”
- Cursive “D”
- Cursive capital “E”
- Cursive “E”
- Cursive capital “F”
- Cursive “F”

 

As with our other English cursive writing lessons, today’s lesson is in PDF form. This is so you can print the lesson or view it full screen.

Please click here for the PDF: How to Write in Cursive Handwriting, Part 1

When you are ready, you can click here for part 2.

Please remember to leave a comment! Writing English handwriting is a big challenge, so let us know how you get on! And if you like this lesson, please share on Facebook or Twitter! 

Jon